THUS the men discoursed together; and meanwhile the mother Went in search of her son,--at first in front of the dwelling On the bench of stone, for he was accustom'd to sit there. FATE AND SYMPATHY. 'Thus he spoke, and then placed the reins in the hands of the pastor,Who, in a knowing way both the foaming horses restraining,Nimbly mounted the carriage, and took the seat of the driver.But you still delay'd, good cautious neighbour, and spoke thusFriend, I will gladly entrust to you soul, and spirit, and mind too,But my body and bones are not preserved in the best wayWhen the hand of a parson such worldly matters as reins grasps! Languages: English, Espanol | Site Copyright © Jalic Inc. 2000 - 2019. Discuss with other readers. First one, whose cattle were weaker,Fain would slowly advance, while others would eagerly hasten.Then there arose a scream of half-crush'd women and children,And a lowing of cattle, with yelping of dogs intermingled,And a wailing of aged and sick, all sitting and shaking,Ranged in their beds on the top of the waggon too-heavily laden.Next some lumbering wheel, push'd out of the track by the pressure,Went to the edge of the roadway; the vehicle fell in the ditch then,Rolling right over, and throwing, in falling, the men who were in itFar in the field, screaming loudly, their persons however uninjured.Then the boxes roll'd off and tumbled close to the waggon.Those who saw them failing full surely expected to see themSmash'd to pieces beneath the weight of the chests and the presses.So the waggon lay broken, and those that it carried were helpless,For the rest of the train went on, and hurriedly pass'd them,Thinking only of self, and carried away by the current.So we sped to the spot, and found the sick and the agedWho, when at home and in bed, could scarcely endure their sad ailments,Lying there on the ground, all sighing and groaning in anguish,Stifled by clouds of dust, and scorch'd by the fierce sun of summer.Then replied in tones of compassion the sensitive landlordHermann I trust will find them and give them refreshment and clothing.I should unwillingly see them: I grieve at the eight of such sorrow.Touch'd by the earliest news of the sad extent of the suffering,Hastily sent we a trifle from out of our superabundance,Just to comfort a few, and then our minds were more easy.Now let us cease to discourse on such a sorrowful subject,For men's hearts are easily overshadow'd by terror,And by care, more odious far to me than misfortune.Now let us go to a cooler place, the little back-parlour;There the sun never shines, and the walls are so thick that the hot airNever can enter; and mother shall forthwith bring us a glass eachFull of fine Eighty-three, well fitted to drive away trouble.This is a bad place for drinking; the flies will hum round the glasses. )Thus on its dusty way advanced the crowded procession,All in hopeless confusion. LION. There are few modern poems of any country so perfect in their kind as the "Hermann and Dorothea" of Goethe. The magistrate answered:'Good tobacco is always a welcome present to trav'llers. 'Then the excellent youth collected himself, and made answer'Truly that man can have no heart, but a bosom of iron,Who no sympathy feels for the wants of unfortunate exiles;He has no sense in his head who, in times of such deep tribulation,Has no concern for himself or for his country's well-being.What I to-day have seen and heard, has stirr'd up my feelings;Well, I have come up here, and seen the beautiful, spreadingLandscape, which in fruitful hills to our sight is presented,Seen the golden fruit of the sheaves all nodding together,And a plentiful crop of fruit, full garners foreboding.But, alas, how near is the foe! It's quick and easy, click here. Yon comes the minister; with him is walking the druggist:They'll be able to give an account of all that has happen'd,What they witness'd, and many a sight I fear which was painful. As the man on a journey who just at the moment of sunsetFixes his gaze once more on the rapidly vanishing planet. Hermann and Dorothea is an epic poem, an idyll, written by German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe between 1796 and 1797, and was to some extent suggested by Johann Heinrich Voss's Luise, an idyll in hexameters, which was first published in 1782-84. 'O how joyful the time, when with his bride the glad bridegroomWhirls in the dance, awaiting the day that will join them for everBut more glorious far was the time when the Highest of all thingsWhich man's mind can conceive, close by and attainable seemed.Then were the tongues of all loosen'd, and words of wisdom and feelingNot by greybeards alone, but by men and by striplings were utter'd. 'Then in the minds of our men arose a terrible yearningThat which was lost to avenge, and that which remain'd to defend still.All of them seized upon arms, lured on by the fugitives' hurry,By their pale faces, and by their shy, uncertain demeanour.There was heard the sound of alarm-bells unceasingly ringing,And the approach of danger restrain'd not their violent fury.Soon into weapons were turn'd the implements peaceful of tillage,And with dripping blood the scythe and the pitchfork were cover'd.Every foeman without distinction was ruthlessly slaughter'd,Fury was ev'rywhere raging, and artful, cowardly weakness.May I never again see men in such wretched confusion!Even the raging wild beast is a better object to gaze on.Ne'er let them speak of freedom, as if themselves they could govern!All the evil which Law has driven farback in the cornerSeems to escape, as soon as the fetters which bound it are loosen'd. 0 with reviews - Be the first. Your eye so true and your true heartRightly have chosen! Join The love story of the young couple is free from wild romance, indeed their love makes them look to the future not with any anticipation of pleasure or extravagance, but with the instinctive conviction that the true blessings of life flow from the performance of necessary tasks. Each person woos for himself now.Everyone now must bear the weight of a maiden's refusalOn his own shoulders, and stand all ashamed before her, if needs be. The subject field is required. 'Then the pastor proceeded to cheer him with words of good comfort,But his companion broke in, in his usual talkative manner'As things used to be, this embarrassment would not have happened,When each matter was brought to a close in an orthodox fashion.Then for their son themselves the bride the parents selected,And a friend of the house was secretly call'd in the first place.He was then quietly sent as a suitor to visit the parentsOf the selected bride; and, dress'd in his gayest apparel,Went after dinner some Sunday to visit the excellent burgher,And began by exchanging polite remarks on all subjects,Cleverly turning and bending the talk in the proper direction.After long beating about the bush, he flatter'd the daughter,And spoke well of the man and the house that gave his commission.Sensible people soon saw his drift, and the sensible envoyWatch'd how the notion was taken, and then could explain himself farther.If they declined the proposal, why then the refusal cost nothing,But if all prosper'd, why then the suitor for ever thereafterPlay'd the first fiddle at every family feast and rejoicing.For the married couple remember'd the whole of their lifetimeWhose was the skilful hand by which the marriage knot tied was.All this now is chang'd, and with many an excellent customHas gone quite out of fashion. WHEN the pastor askd the foreign magistrate questionsWhat the people had sufferd how long from their homes they had wanderd. 'Thus he spake, and then listen'd. Page THE AGE.WHEN the pastor ask'd the foreign magistrate questions,What the people had suffer'd, how long from their homes they had wander'd,Then the man replied:--'By no means short are our sorrows,For we have drunk the bitters of many a long year together,All the more dreadful, because our fairest hopes have been blighted.Who can deny that his heart beat wildly and high in his bosomAnd that with purer pulses his breast more freely was throbbing,When the newborn sun first rose in the whole of its glory,When we heard of the right of man, to have all things in common,Heard of noble Equality, and of inspiriting Freedom!Each man then hoped to attain new life for himself, and the fettersWhich had encircled many a land appear'd to be broken,Fetters held by the hands of sloth and selfish indulgence.Did not all nations turn their gaze, in those days of emotion,Tow'rds the world's capital, which so many a long year had been so,And then more than ever deserved a name so distinguish'd?Were not the men, who first proclaim'd so noble a message,Names that are worthy to rank with the highest the sun ever shone on,Did not each give to mankind his courage and genius and language?

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