Part 8.1. Part 6.1. Part 8.3. EconTalk: Russ Roberts, Library of Economics and Liberty, Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art lectures. Highly recommended for beginners and experts alike! Part 7.2. Copyright © 2020 Apple Inc. All rights reserved. The difference between internalist and externalist accounts of knowledge; whether we need external factors to justify knowledge or whether internal accounts are sufficient, and the Gettier cases. and the theory of justification of propositions and beliefs. The final part of this series. Part 4.4. Concludes a historical survey of philosophy with Immanuel Kant, who thought Hume was wrong in his idea of human nature and how we gain knowledge of the world. Criticisms of the resemblance theory of perception and an introduction to idealism - that perceptions of the external world are all within the mind as ideas. Explores the distinction between mind and body and whether this makes a difference to the idea of personal identity. Part 2.5. Part 2.2. Part 2.7. Outlines Galileo's revolutionary theories of astronomy and mechanical science and introduces Descartes' (the father of modern philosophy) ideas of philosophical scepticism. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will. Part 2.1. Part 6.3. Part 8.4. This website uses cookies for Google Analytics tracking - please see our Privacy Policy, About | Accessibility | Contribute | Copyright | Contact us | Privacy, 'Oxford Podcasts' Twitter account @oxfordpodcasts, MediaPub Publishing Portal for Oxford Podcast Contributors. Individuals interested in the 'big' questions about life such as how we perceive the world, who we are in the world and whether we are free to act will find this series informative, comprehensive and accessible. Criticisms of the resemblance theory of perception and an introduction to idealism - that perceptions of the external world are all within the mind as ideas. Looks at the problem of knowledge; how can we know what we know, three types of knowledge and A J Ayer's two conditions for knowledge. | 454904 Part 7.1. Introduction to the philosophy of John Locke, 'England's first Empiricist', he also gives a very simplistic definition of Empiricism; we obtain knowledge through experience of the world, through sensory data (what we see, hear, etc). These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. Introduces the concept of personal identity, what is it to be a person, whether someone is the same person over time and Leibniz's law of sameness. Explores the idea of conscious and unconscious knowledge (should a person know that they know something or does it not matter?) Criticisms of Locke's view of personal identity; if personal identity is dependent on memory then how does forgetting personal history and the concept of false memory change Locke's view of personal identity. Part 1.3. PDF slides from Peter Millican's General Philosophy lecture 3. PDF slides from Peter Millican's General Philosophy lecture 4. Part 6.2. Part 4.2. General Philosophy - YouTube. Part 7.4. A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. Part 8.4. Part 7.1. Looks at John Locke's view of personal identity; how consciousness and 'personal history' distinguish personal identity and the idea of memory as crucial for personal identity. Criticisms of Locke's view of personal identity; if personal identity is dependent on memory then how does forgetting personal history and the concept of false memory change Locke's view of personal identity. Outlines the General Philosophy course, the various topics that will be discussed, and also, more importantly, the philosophical method that this course introduces to students. Nice stage setting for additional study. Part 5.3. PDF slides from Peter Millican's General Philosophy lecture 8. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will. PDF slides from Peter Millican's General Philosophy lecture 1. Part 6.2. Part 5.2. Introduces Descartes' idea of dualism, that there is a separation between the mind and the body, as well as some of the philosophical issues surrounding this idea. While watching, I switch to iBooks and follow along with the PDF slides. A brief overview of contemporary accounts of perception; including phenomenalism (that objects are logical constructions from sense data) and direct realism (that we perceive objects and the external world directly). The wonder of technology aside, this is an insightful and well put together sprint through philosophy. Introduces Descartes' idea of dualism, that there is a separation between the mind and the body, as well as some of the philosophical issues surrounding this idea. Individuals interested in the 'big' questions about life such as how we perceive the world, who we are in the world and whether we are free to act will find this series informative, comprehensive and accessible. A brief explanation of Hume's argument for sentimentalism and Robert Kane's views on free will and determinism. 1.1 An Introduction to General Philosophy, 1.2 The Background of Early Modern Philosophy, 2.1 Recap of General Philosophy Lecture 1, 2.2 Thomas Hobbes: The Monster of Malmesbury, 2.5 Nicolas Malebranche and George Berkeley, 4.2 Possible Answers to External World Scepticism, 5.2 The Traditional Analysis of Knowledge, 5.4 Scepticism, Externalism and the Ethics of Belief, 6.1 Introduction to Primary and Secondary Qualities, 7.4 Making Sense of Free Will and Moral Responsibility, 8.3 Problems for Locke's View of Personal Identity. PDF slides from Peter Millican's General Philosophy lecture 7. Taking a chronological view of the history of philosophy, each lecture is split into 3 or 4 sections which outline a particular philosophical problem and how different philosophers have attempted to resolve the issue. Part 5.4. Part 5.1. Looks at the role the concept of knowledge plays in life, the different levels of knowledge we require in certain contexts and the return of scepticism over knowledge. A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. Investigates some of the possible solutions to Descartes' sceptical problem of the external world, looking at G.E Moore's response, among others, to the problem. Part 2.3. Explores Berkeley's and Locke's arguments concerning the resemblance of qualities and objects; that the perceived qualities of objects exist only in the mind or whether secondary qualities are intrinsically part of the object. The final part of this series. Part 7.4. General Philosophy podcast on demand - A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. A brief overview of contemporary accounts of perception; including phenomenalism (that objects are logical constructions from sense data) and direct realism (that we perceive objects and the external world directly). Gives a very brief history of philosophy from the 'birth of philosophy' in Ancient Greece through the rise of Christianity in Europe in the Middle Ages through to the Renaissance, the Reformation and the birth of the Modern Period. Looks at John Locke's view of personal identity; how consciousness and 'personal history' distinguish personal identity and the idea of memory as crucial for personal identity. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. Outlines Galileo's revolutionary theories of astronomy and mechanical science and introduces Descartes' (the father of modern philosophy) ideas of philosophical scepticism. Part 1.2. Escucha y descarga gratis los episodios de General Philosophy. Sports, music, news and podcasts. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. A brief explanation of Hume's argument for sentimentalism and Robert Kane's views on free will and determinism. Hear the audio that matters most to you. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. An introduction to Robert Boyle's theory of corpuscularianism and Isaac Newton's ideas on mathematics and the universe. Describes briefly the Aristotelian view of the universe; the basis for natural science in Europe until the 15th century and its conflict Galileo's theories. Part 7.3. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. Part 5.3. Introduces 18th Century Scottish philosopher David Hume, 'The Great Infidel', including his life, works and a brief look at his philosophical thoughts. Explores the distinction between mind and body and whether this makes a difference to the idea of personal identity. Part 4.3. Briefly introduces the problem of induction: that is, the problem that it is difficult to justify claims to knowledge of the world through pure reason, i.e.

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